A Committed, Supportive Animal Community in Boston

“Dancing with Spheres” sculpture by renowned sculptor David Phillips is now a permanent fixture in the dog play yard at the Animal Rescue League (ARL) of Boston.  Way to go ARL Boston!  To read the full story, click here.

Image

It is great to see a committed animal community!  Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode is a local animal rescue in El Dorado county.  Animal Outreach has been serving El Dorado county, Sacramento county and beyond, for over 20 years.  Can you help support us?

Animal Outreach needs volunteers in all areas of its operations from adoption counselors and foster parents for dogs and cats to cleaning crew for the shelter.  Call 530.642.2287 or go online to animaloutreach.net to fill out an application.

Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode also needs your financial support to continue its mission of saving the lives of pets in Northern California.  Please join our Strut Your Mutt team (for dogs and cats) or sponsor an existing team member today.  We truly appreciate your support.

Kitten and Puppy Season

Kitten & Puppy Season

By

Shelter Exchange

(with minor edits by Diane Robertson)

(http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=038674392f4f6e1fd5a38443a&id=897dbb6210)

Many of the shelters and rescue groups we work with are already seeing the extra pitter-patter of tiny kitten and puppy feet as spring is the time of year that non-spayed and neutered animals naturally reproduce. Litters of unwanted and unplanned puppies and kittens are being surrendered to shelters, many are found as strays, and sadly, many of these babies may not make it out of shelters in time if more cannot be done to reduce the number of animals entering shelters.

The knock on effect of so many new animals currently entering shelters is many of the older animals are overlooked in favor of the younger fresh-faced puppies and kittens.  Shelters are literally bursting at their seams through the spring and summer, but the good news is, there are ways you can help!

Foster an animal. This is a life saving act that anyone can do. Are you not ready for the commitment of a animal but you still want the experience? Fostering is for you!

Adopt. Now is the time to adopt if you are looking for a specific breed, a puppy or kitten as there are so many more in need of homes!

dog_theykilledmetoday

Spay & neuter your pets. This is the most important thing that any responsible pet owner can do, not only to ensure your pet cannot reproduce, but also for their health. Educate others around you to do the same. Many shelters and rescue groups run free or discounted spay & neuter days, make sure you take advantage of these!

Donate your time, money or items to your local shelter or rescue group. Many people are looking for ways to help but cannot foster or adopt. Can you spare a few hours a month to volunteer? Can you round up neighbors and collect used towels or blankets to give animals some comfort? Why not organize a food & toy collection with co-workers? There are so many ways to help, be creative!

From Diane Robertson:

Please contact Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode if you would like to know about available  dogs, puppies, cats and kittens or how you can help by fostering, donating, volunteering or sponsoring. Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode is your local rescue group serving El Dorado County and beyond for over 20 years.

 Animal Outreach of the Mother Lode Website, Facebook Page, Facebook Dog Rescue Page

Strut Your Mutt Fundraiser to Help Save More Lives

The Solution Starts with You

By Diane Robertson

It is much too easy with our busy lives to dismiss the idea that “we” could help with the rescue of homeless animals.  Please read on to understand that there are many ways that everyone can and should help avoid the problem of homeless animals.

First, make sure you spay or neuter your dogs and cats.  Unless you are a breeder, there is no reason not to do this. There are low-cost options available almost everywhere.

Second, keep your companions happy and healthy and forever.  Commit yourself to keeping your animal regardless of the challenges you may face.  There are individuals and groups that can help.  If you are challenged by lack of money to feed your animals, a behavior problem, a move or another challenge you need to understand that there is help available.  Ask around, call the animal shelter, your local rescue groups and others.  Do not abandon your animal at the local pound!  Dropping your dog or cat off at the local shelter is cruel.  Your companion does not understand what is happening, they can become very stressed, can become sick and worse yet, may be immediately killed if they are old or perceived to be unadoptable.  You owe it to your dogs and cats to do everything possible to keep them with you forever.

What will happen to your animals if you suddenly pass away?  If you do not make plans for them now, there is a good chance that they will be taken to the local animal shelter when you die.  If you have a will or trust be sure to keep it updated with plans for your companion animals. If you don’t have a will, make one.  Everyone should have a will, even young people.  Legal Zoom (legalzoom.com) is a good, low-cost source of legal documents that you can use to protect your family and companions.  If you are a senior citizen, check with your county Human Services department.  Many counties offer low-cost or free legal assistance to senior citizens.  If you have the money, contact an attorney who is familiar with setting up wills and trusts for animals.

Start a “Rainy Day” fund for your pets.  Just like you budget for car maintenance and clothing and groceries, you also need to budget for the cost of food and medical care for your animals.  If you start a separate account for your pets and make regular deposits, a visit to the vet or Emergency vet will not be a problem.  Planning ahead is the key to being successful both in life and love (or so I’m told).

In my next blog I will talk about the many ways you can help with the physical rescue and rehoming of companion animals.  There are many easy ways that everyone can help and it does not have to involve your money or opening your home to new animals.

Companion Animals 101

By Diane Robertson

I want to start my blog by saying that I was horrified to learn that up to 90% of the animals taken to animal shelters are killed.  Some shelters are the opposite, with “live release” numbers around 90% with about a 10% kill rate.  For those awesome shelters, we can safely assume the 10% were truly euthanized and not just killed.

There is a big difference between the words killed and euthanized.  Many people use the word euthanized because it sounds better than saying killed.  I would like to suggest that people use the correct terminology.  Pets are euthanized when they are suffering, when they have reached the end of the lives, when they are racked with cancer and other valid reasons.  It is an act of compassion.  Some animal shelters simply kill animals that have been surrendered to them or that have been caught as strays.  Really!  For example, there are many shelters that do not allow adoptions of pit bulls.  What this means is the animal comes in the front door and immediately goes out the back door in a body bag.  Most shelters have a 10-14 holding period after which the animal will be killed.  This includes perfectly healthy puppies, pure breed dogs and cats, and everything in between.

No kidding folks.  Check out the ASPCA, the No-Kill Nation and your local shelters.  They all tell the same story.  Also, your local shelter may also publicize their intake and adoption rates on their website or Facebook page.  Shelters that kill healthy animals often believe they are doing the right thing for the community.  They believe that there are not enough homes for all the animals and so this is work that must be done to control the dog and cat population.  I reject these arguments and so do millions of other people in this country.

How can you help?

  1. Get your dogs and cats fixed (spayed or neutered).  Most areas have low-cost and no-cost programs.  If you still cannot afford any small fee being charged, ask for help.  There are lots of folks out there that can afford $35 to help potentially save dozens of lives that just one unaltered dog or cat can produce.
  2. Adopt your next cat or dog from a rescue group or shelter.  Never buy a cat or dog on the Internet or from a breeder you do not know very well.  Many rescue groups have available animals at your local Petsmart store, online at petfinder.com, other websites and at local shelters.
  3. Help educate people on the importance of spaying and neutering their pets and learn about the TNR (trap, neuter and return) movement.  “Community” cats are becoming more common these days.  A community cat or colony of cats refers to unowned cats that live in the community but the entire community helps by leaving food and water out for the animals and providing some type of shelter for the animals.

I encourage everyone to read more about animal shelters, visit your local shelters, volunteer when possible, donate when possible and consider fostering a dog or cat until it can be adopted.

Boolie

Scratcher of heads, rubber of bellies

Official Selenium Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Girls Just Gotta Have Funds Blog

Remember, Girls Just Gotta Have Funds!

No Dog About It Blog

It's all about dogs!

Suzie Speaks

The Adventures Of a Thirty-Something Life

Gabriel Lucatero

Fiction Writer

joeseeberblog

This WordPress.com site is the cat’s pajamas

STOP ANIMAL ABUSE

Sharing News, Views & Petitions Regards Animal Abuse. Plus Various Animal Stories From Around The World

Kitty Bloger

Just another site about cats

Tails of a Relentless Rescuer

Saving dogs and grinding axes... all here in Texas

dogsarethehelp

Just another WordPress.com site

Schroedinger's Cat

Many worlds and one cat

Hollis Plample

draws comics

FOX40

Sacramento breaking news, weather, sports and social media

laurakane1

A great WordPress.com site

%d bloggers like this: